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Star Trek

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Star Trek--Pigs in Space

Star Trek meets Pigs in Space in a cover used for both Frantic and Crazy magazines.

Poster.bathofpig

1997 Muppet calendar.

MB Star Trek 207

"I Want My Muppet TV!"

MB Star Trek 512

"The Air Conditioner at the End of the Galaxy"

MB Star Trek 708

"Muppet Babies: The Next Generation"

Scooter-enterprised

"A Punch Line to the Tummy"

Muppetcomic-enterprise

Muppet Magazine, Summer 1983

Janice reviews Star Trek IV

Muppet Magazine, Winter 1987

Starcluck

Muppet Magazine, Summer 1987

MB comic 2 Star Trek

Muppet Babies comic book #2

MB comic 13 Star Trek

Muppet Babies comic book #13

Beam Me Up Gonzo

"Beam Me Up Gonzo"

FozziesTrunk small

"To boldly go where no bear has gone before!"

Clingons

"Clingons"

Ojo Star Trek badge

Ojo's Star Trek-like badge.

Sesametrek

Sesamstrasse postcard.

Ernie Spock t-shirt

Sesamstrasse t-shirt.

The Star Trek franchise consists of five live-action (and one animated) TV series and twelve motion pictures, which boldly go where no one has gone before. The franchise began as a TV series on NBC which ran from 1966 until 1969, and was "re-booted" with a successful new feature film series in 2009. The Muppets have spoofed Star Trek on many occasions over the years.

References

Sesame Street

  • Sesame Street Episode 3698 is part of a story arc in which Slimey the Worm ventures to the Moon. The episode closes with a mission statement inspired by the narration that begins each episode of Star Trek: The Original Series and Star Trek: The Next Generation. The space shuttle that takes the worms into space, the wormship Wiggleprise, is also a spoof on Star Trek’s Enterprise.
  • Spaceship Surprise on Sesame Street parodied aspects of the original Star Trek, and the later incarnation Spaceship Surprise: The Next Generation specifically spoofed the cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  • A Super Morphin Mega Monsters sketch on Sesame Street features the classic "door opening" sound effect used on the original 1960s Star Trek series when Zostic's minions enter his lair to do his bidding.
  • Wanda Cousteau's mission on Sesame Street is a reference to the opening narration from Star Trek. When she announces her mission "to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations -- to boldly go where no fish has gone before!" (SSvideo)
  • Patrick Stewart, famous for playing Captain Jean-Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation, appeared in a segment with The Count. When The Count has trouble getting a set of Muppet numbers to stay in line, Stewart helps him out by commanding, "Make it so, Number One!" This is a reference to an oft-spoken phrase by his Trek character to his first officer. (YouTube)
  • In episode 4039 of Sesame Street, Bob greets Elmo and Zoe (who are pretending to be aliens) with the Vulcan hand sign and a Star Wars line.
  • In the animated short that appears in "i-Sam", the fourth chapter of A Sesame Street Christmas Carol, the voice-over narrator says: "And now your holiday will boldly go where no holiday has gone before," a reference to the title sequence of both the original Star Trek and Star Trek: The next Generation television series. The narrator continues: "In the future, Santa will use a rocket sled." Santa Claus is shown seated in a captains chair similar to that of the Starship Enterprise, with a reindeer as a crew member. Santa says "That's Earth. Warp factor three," to which the reindeer responds "Aye, captain."
  • When Elmo went to NASA for the week-long celebration leading up to the final launch of its Space Shuttle program, he held a press conference with two astronauts. When fielding a question from the audience, Elmo asked Mike Massimino to define the word exploration: "It means finding new things, and going someplace no one else has gone before." Elmo responded, "to boldly go where no one has gone before," quoting the famous Star Trek narration.[1]
  • In the CD-ROM game, Ernie's Adventures in Space, Bert is seen writing a captains log (a log-shaped book) and quotes the famous Star Trek lines ("Captain's Log. Stardate...")

The Muppets

  • When Jim Hawkins tells Billy Bones what he'd do with a treasure map in Muppet Treasure Island, Gonzo agrees: "That's right! We'd be out searching for that treasure, sailing the seven seas on a five year mission, boldly going where no man has gone before! (Say, that's catchy)."
  • The score for Muppets from Space incorporates Alexander Courage's music for the original Star Trek during a speech made by K. Edgar Singer, which is reminiscent of William Shatner's voice-over from the original series. In the same scene, Gonzo supporters carry signs that read, "Beam Me Up, Gonzo," another reference to a famously paraphrased line from the original Star Trek series.
  • Muppet Magazine issue 3 features what is mostly a Star Wars parody on board a ship resembling the Millenium Falcon. At the end of the comic, the U.S.S. Enterprise shows up and blasts the much smaller ship with its phasers.
  • In the Little Muppet Monsters episode "Space Cowboys," twice Tug narrates a space log, a common story device in Star Trek. His narrative also mentions ventures into "strange new worlds." Later, Tugs announces "Let's boldly go where no monsters have gone before!" Both quotes are references to the title sequence of the original Star Trek television series.
  • The 14th volume of "Gonzo's Weirder Than Me" column in the Spring 1986 issue of Muppet Magazine features a photo of the alien Balok as seen in the 1960s series episode, "The Corbomite Maneuver." Gonzo comments that it's easy to see why this stunning creature made space a place no man had gone before.
  • In the Winter 1987 issue of Muppet Magazine, Janice reviews Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, commenting that its premise of traveling back in time to 1986 Earth is "gnarly." A photo of William Shatner as Captain Kirk is featured.
  • The Spring 1988 issue of Muppet Magazine featured an interview with Wil Wheaton who was then starring in the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. Photos of the cast and the Enterprise-D illustrate the article as well as a picture of Wheaton being shipped to the Enterprise in a cardboard box.
  • Gonzo appears in the Jim Henson Hour Pitch Reel and asks of Jim Henson, "Beam me up, Jimmy!" This is a reference to the oft-parodied, but misquoted, line from the original Star Trek in which Captain Kirk would order chief engineer Mr. Scott to transport the landing party back to the Enterprise.
  • "Pigs in Space: Deep Dish Nine" was an attempt to update the classic Pigs in Space sketches from The Muppet Show to a new Muppet series, Muppets Tonight, in the same way Gene Roddenberry came back to his Star Trek universe in the 1980s series, Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  • First Mate Piggy made an appearance in the Special Collector's Edition of the Star Trek: 30 Years magazine in a section dedicated to celebrity experiences with Star Trek. In her interview, Piggy confesses that she is too young to have seen the original series on television, but became a devoted fan during reruns.
  • The 1997 Muppet Parody Calendar: The Sequel features a spoof of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. In a scene on a transporter platform, Gonzo is dressed as Mr. Spock, Kermit as Captain Kirk, and Miss Piggy is showering covered only in bubbles: "The Bath of Pig." This was also printed as a wall poster.
  • In one installment of The Muppets comic strip (reprinted in Moving Right Along), Fozzie Bear refers to the daunting task of cleaning his room as "To boldly go where no bear has gone before!", a reference to the title sequence of the original Star Trek television series.
  • Another installment of The Muppets comic strip (reprinted in On the Town) features Dr. Julius Strangepork and First Mate Piggy engaged by "Clingons," a popular joke about Star Trek's alien race of Klingons.
  • In the Pigs in Space segment of The Muppet Show Comic Book: On the Road #2, Dr. Julius Strangepork offers a solution for how to get the Swinetrek crew back to normal: "According to Roddenberry's Theorum, the time-space continuum will snap back into its normal state if a temporal anomaly is introduced, jump-starting the standard timeline." As this translates in layman's terms, you just have to make a call on your cell phone. Gene Roddenberry was the creator of Star Trek.
  • When squire Arthur (Kermit) pulls Excaliber from the stone in Muppet King Arthur #1, the sword catches the sunlight. Slim Wilson remarks, "Nice lens flare." His companion replies, "Pfft... Like we didn't get enough of those in Star Trek." This is a reference to what many critics have called an overuse of lens flares by J.J. Abrams in the 2009 film.
  • In the Muppets Inside CD-ROM game, when Fozzie and Kermit first enter the "Data-Bus", Fozzie places a command: "Ahead, warp factor one, Mr. Sulu."
  • In Miss Piggy's Rules, Miss Piggy suggests taping your favorite Oprahs over your boyfriend's collection of Star Trek episodes.
  • During their November 17, 2011 appearance on Good Morning America, Lara Spencer asks the Muppets to weigh in on the Star Wars vs Star Trek faux-feud between William Shatner and Carrie Fisher. Kermit responds that he thinks of himself as a Trekkie.

Muppet Babies

  • Gonzo presents "Weirdo Trek" in "I Want My Muppet TV!" using a combination of footage from the 1960s series and featuring the Babies as Star Trek characters. Gonzo plays Mister Weirdo, Kermit as Captain Kirkmit, Rowlf as Dr. Dogbones, Scooter as Scootie, Skeeter as a Spaceship Secondprise crewmember, and Piggy, Beaker, Bunsen and Fozzie as Static Klingons.
  • Nanny gets a parrot named Polly on loan from the pet store in "Fine Feathered Enemies." The bird speaks various television catchprases including "Beam me up, Scotty" and "Warp factor nine, Mister Sulu."
  • "The Air Conditioner at the End of the Galaxy" opens with footage of the Enterprise-D and the babies playing their previously-established Star Trek spoof characters. The Secondprise is on its way to the nearest starbase with two Static Klingons (Piggy and Fozzie) as their prisoner.
  • In "A Punch Line to the Tummy," Baby Scooter is watching Star Trek: The Next Generation and imagines himself floating in space next to the U.S.S. Enterprise-D (Scooter anticipates the arrival of Captain Kirk, however the captain of the ship as featured is Captain Picard).
  • In "Muppet Babies: The Next Generation," Rowlf travels to the Starship Boobieprise in a phone booth and meets his grandson, Lieutenant Woof (spoofing the Klingon character Worf). When Rowlf expects to find Captain Kirkmit and Mr. Weirdo, Woof explains that they're in The Next Generation now, but beams up the former characters anyway. Scooter appears as Geordi La Forge. Additionally, when the gang thinks Rowlf is playing charades, Skeeter guesses "the bath of Kahn".
  • The Muppet Babies comic book #2 features a spoof of both Star Trek and Star Wars franchises called "The Big Space Adventure." Baby Piggy appears in a Princess Leia costume, while the rest of the babies play her loyal crew in classic Star Trek uniforms, including an upside-down arrowhead badge, reminiscent of the Star Trek logo.
  • The Muppet Babies comic book #13 included a Star Trek story, "Out of This World". The story featured Kermit as Captain Kermit, Gonzo as Spock, Rowlf as Scotty, Scooter and Skeeter as Sulu and Chekov, and Piggy as a space princess. The Babies' spaceship (which looks a great deal like the Swinetrek) runs out of fuel on their way to bring Princess Piggy back to her home planet. The ship makes an emergency landing on Jokeville, where everything is a gag. This story was written by Muppet writer Bill Prady.

Other

  • In many episodes of the Fraggle Rock animated series, the Fraggles were heard to utter the words "to boldly go where no Fraggle has gone before" (a reference to the famous line uttered by William Shatner and Patrick Stewart).

Muppet Mentions

Vger

Not Miss Piggy and Darth Vader.

Sttng okudagram

Clare Raymond's descendants as seen in the broadcast version of Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Neutral Zone."

  • Various sources, including Microsoft's Encarta Encyclopedia,[2] claim that Miss Piggy and Darth Vader can be seen in the 1979 film Star Trek: The Motion Picture. The images appear at 1:36:30 in the film when Spock enters the V'Ger entity. High definition reproductions of the film prove that the images are abstract and any likeness is coincidental.
  • In the 1988 Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Neutral Zone," a character from the 20th century finds herself 400 years in her future on board the starship Enterprise-D. When researching what has become of her descendants, a graphical family tree shows amongst the names, Kermit T. Frog, Miss Piggy, Mary Richards and several actors who have portrayed the Doctor on Doctor Who.[3] The names were replaced on the remastered 2012 Blu-ray release.
  • Miss Piggy was interviewed for the Star Trek 30 Years celebration magazine in 1996 (pg. 74), published by TV Guide. Featured as a famous player sharing Star Trek memories in her role as First Mate of the Swinetrek, she claims to have been far too young to have seen the original series on the air, but that she became a devoted fan in reruns. A mention was also made of her run-in with Star Trek actor Leonard Nimoy who appeared in a "Pigs in Space: Deep Dish Nine" sketch on Muppets Tonight.
  • In the 1997 documentary Trekkies, Marc Okrand (creator of the Klingon language) states that one of the many songs that fans have translated into Klingon is the "Sesame Street Theme."
  • During promotion for Star Trek in 2009, Zachary Quinto (the actor who played Spock) sang the "Fraggle Rock Theme" during press junkets more than once.[4]
  • In the special features for the Star Trek (2009) home video release, Rachel Nichols appears in the featurette, "To Boldy Go: The Green Girl." Nichols plays Gaila, a green-skinned alien, and is required to undergo hours of green makeup application before filming. While speaking with one of the film's child actors, she jokes that her boyfriends could be the Grinch, the Hulk or Kermit the Frog.
  • In 2010, Film Score Monthly released a 14-disc boxed set of music composed by Ron Jones for Star Trek: The Next Generation. Disc 4 contains a track from the season one episode "Skin of Evil" titled "It's Not Easy Bein' Slime" referencing "Bein' Green."
  • In the "Inside the Writer's Room" discussion panel on the Star Trek: The Next Generation season three Blu-ray release, the writers compare the episode "Rascals," a story that finds four members of the Enterprise crew transformed into adolescent versions of themselves in a transporter accident, to the concept of Muppet Babies.

Connections

Kirkthatcherpunk

Designer/writer Kirk Thatcher gives the bird to Kirk in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Michelansisti-tng

Suit performer and occasional Muppeteer Michelan Sisti as a Ferengi in "Bloodlines"

  • F. Murray Abraham played Ahdar Ru'afo in Star Trek: Insurrection (1998, film)
  • Jason Alexander played Kurros in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Think Tank" (1999)
  • Kirstie Alley played Lieutenant Saavik in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982, film)
  • Wayne Allwine edited sound effects for Star Trek V: The Final Frontier
  • Philip Anthony-Rodriguez played Juan in the Enterprise episode "Horizon" (2003)
  • Michael Berry Jr. played a Romulan tactical officer in Star Trek (2009, film)
  • Theodore Bikel played Sergey Rozhenko in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Family" (1990)
  • Julianne Buescher provided the Enterprise Computer voice and other voices in Star Trek Into Darkness (2013, film)
  • LeVar Burton played Geordi La Forge on Star Trek: The Next Generation
  • Kevin Carlson worked as puppeteer for the Exocomps in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Quality of Life" (1993)
  • John Cho played Hikaru Sulu in the films Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
  • Bill Cobbs played Emory Erickson in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode "Daedalus" (2005)
  • Joan Collins played Edith Keeler in The Original Series episode "The City on the Edge of Forever" (1967)
  • James Cromwell played Prime Minister Nayrok on the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Hunted" (1990) and Jaglom Shrek in "Birthright, Parts I & II" (1993), Minister Hanok in the Star Trek: Deep Space 9 episode "Starship Down," and Zefram Cochrane in Star Trek: First Contact (1996, film) and the Star Trek: Enterprise premiere episode.
  • Benedict Cumberbatch played Khan Noonien Singh in Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
  • Barry Dennen played voice roles in the videogames Star Trek: Hidden Evil (1999, as Admiral Rotok), Star Trek: Armada II (2001, various), and Star Trek: Bridge Commander (2002, as Gul Oden and Captain Terrik)
  • Juliana Donald played Tayna in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "A Matter of Perspective" (1990), Emi in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Prophet Motive" (1995), and Shoreham in Star Trek: Borg (1996, video game)
  • Paul Dooley played Enabran Tain in four episodes of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.
  • Michael Dorn, played Lt. Worf on Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
  • Jane Espenson wrote the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Accession" (1996)
  • John Franklyn-Robbins played Macias in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Preemptive Strike" (1994)
  • Matt Frewer played Berlinghoff Rasmussen in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "A Matter of Time" (1991)
  • John Glover played Verad in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Invasive Procedures" (1993)
  • Whoopi Goldberg played Guinan on Star Trek: The Next Generation (seasons 2-6)
  • Kelsey Grammer played Captain Morgan Bateson in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Cause and Effect" (1992)
  • Joel Grey played Caylem in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Resistance" (1995)
  • Bob Gunton played Captain Benjamin Maxwell in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Wounded" (1991)
  • Mariette Hartley played Zarabeth in "All Our Yesterdays" (1969)
  • Teri Hatcher played B. G. Robinson in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Outrageous Okona" (1988)
  • Sally Kellerman played Dr. Elizabeth Dehner in the Star Trek episode "Where No Man Has Gone Before" (1966)
  • Kristanna Loken played Malia in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Favorite Son" (1997)
  • Gates McFadden played Doctor Beverly Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation
  • Virginia Madsen played Kellin in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Unforgettable" (1998)
  • Robert Mandan played Kotan Pa'Dar in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Cardassians" (1993)
  • Andrea Martin played Ishka in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Family Business" (1995)
  • Michael McKean played the Clown in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "The Thaw" (1996)
  • Gary Morgan stunt doubled as the Ferengi Kayron in the Next Generation episode "The Last Outpost" (1987)
  • Leonard Nimoy played Spock on Star Trek and in subsequent movies from Star Trek: The Motion Picture(1979) to Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), as well as Star Trek (2009).
  • Josh Pais played Gaila in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episodes "Business as Usual" and "The Magnificent Ferengi" (1997)
  • Robert Picardo played the Doctor on Star Trek: Voyager
  • Suzie Plakson, played Selar on the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "The Schizoid Man" (1989) and K'Ehleyr in "The Emissary" (1989) and "Reunion" (1990), Female Q on the Star Trek: Voyager episode "The Q and the Grey" (1996), and Tarah in the Enterprise episode "Cease Fire" (2003)
  • Bill Prady wrote the season five Star Trek: Voyager episode "Bliss"
  • Zachary Quinto played Spock in the 2009 reboot
  • Rino Romano voiced Alexander Munro in the video game Star Trek: Elite Force II (2003)
  • Deep Roy played Keenser in the films Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
  • Zoe Saldana played Uhura in the films Star Trek (2009) and Star Trek Into Darkness (2013)
  • William Schallert played Nilz Barris in the Star Trek episode "The Trouble with Tribbles" (1967) and Varani in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episode "Sanctuary" (1993)
  • Reiner Schöne played Esoqq in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Allegiance" (1990)
  • William Shatner played Captain James T. Kirk on Star Trek and in the animated series and subsequent films from Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979) to Star Trek: Generations (1994).
  • Sarah Silverman played Rain Robinson in the Star Trek: Voyager 2-part episode "Future's End" (1996)
  • Michelan Sisti played Tol in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Bloodlines" (1994)
  • Patrick Stewart played Captain Jean-Luc Picard on Star Trek: The Next Generation
  • George Takei played Hikaru Sulu on Star Trek and subsequent films, and voiced various aliens on Star Trek: The Animated Series
  • Nick Tate played Durgo in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Final Mission" (1990)
  • Kirk Thatcher worked on Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, as associate producer, composer/singer of the song "I Hate You," voice of the Vulcan computer, and appeared as "Punk on the Bus" in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home.
  • Brian Tochi played Ray Tsingtao in the Star Trek episode "And the Children Shall Lead" (1968) and Ensign Kenny Lin in the Star Trek: Next Generation episode "Night Terrors" (1991)
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson appears in the Star Trek: Voyager season 3 documentary "Real Science" (2004)
  • Jay Underwood played Mortimer Harren in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Good Shepherd"
  • Ben Vereen played Dr. LaForge in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode 'Interface" (1993)
  • David Warner played Ambassador St. John Talbot in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1987, film), Chancellor Gorkon in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991, film), and Cardassian Gul Madred in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Chain of Command, Part I and Part II" (1992)
  • Frank Welker voiced child Spock's screams in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984, film) and an alien in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Nothing Human" (1998)
  • Orson Welles provided narration for Star Trek: The Motion Picture advertisements (1979)
  • Wil Wheaton played Wesley Crusher on Star Trek: The Next Generation.
  • Paul Williams played Koru in the Star Trek: Voyager episode "Virtuoso" (2000)
  • Alfre Woodard played Lily Sloane in Star Trek: First Contact (1996, film)

Sources

  1. Science Channel Facebook page video excerpt July 9, 2011
  2. archive.org and 2000 CD-ROM
  3. Star Trek Chronology (0-671-79611-9), Michael Okuda and Denise Okuda, 1993
  4. MTV interview with Quinto and Chris Pine

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